Recent Updates

  • A paragraph break (hit Enter or Return on the keyboard) is always more meaningful than a line break (hit Shift + Enter or Return on the keyboard).  A paragraph break inserts what looks like a double-space in between one line of text and another, and allows screen reader users to parse the information on the page more readily.

    Although programs like Microsoft Word have options to create single-spaced documents with paragraph breaks, web pages do not.  You may find using a line break more esthetically pleasing than a paragraph break, but line breaks can create problems for screen reader users.

    While a screen reader can interpret a paragraph break as "blank," a line break may not be indicated to the user.  The text on the new line may sound like a new sentence, instead of the start of a new paragraph.

  • Manual Sakai Basics
  • Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    How can I make images more accessible?

    Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    Accessibility Information

    Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    How can I make links accessible?

    Assistive technology users use link lists to navigate content. This means they cannot rely on context to tell what a link does. Each link needs to be uniquely descriptive of what it does. The best place to uniquely identify a link is in the link text. Good examples are: "View Assignment 34," "Visit Entomological Society of America," etc.

  • If you think of a vertical series of items as a list, you should include it in your page as a numbered or bulleted list.  Screen readers can identify lists; for example, a bulleted list containing two items may begin: "List of  two items. Bullet 1."

  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    How can I make tables more accessible?

    Manual Sakai Basics
  • Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    Accessibility Information

    Sakai is a Learning Management System created to assist faculty and students by providing online tools for communication, assessment, content delivery, etc.

    Sakai is composed of sites, and each site has a number of tools selected by the site creator. There is also a special site, My Workspace, private to you, where you can access personal information and change your settings.

    This document is assistive technology agnostic and will briefly describe the different areas of the interface, point out how they are implemented for accessibility, and go into more depth where extra assistance may be needed.

    If you need specific help with your assistive technology, please contact your institution's office for Disability Student Services and/or Information Technology Services.

    For additional information visit the Accessibility Working Group on the Confluence Wiki.

    Note: The content depicted in images on this page may differ from what you experience, due to your institutions customization of Sakai.