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  • Manual Sakai Basics
  • Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    How can I make images more accessible?

    Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    Accessibility Information

    Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    How can I make links accessible?

    Assistive technology users use link lists to navigate content. This means they cannot rely on context to tell what a link does. Each link needs to be uniquely descriptive of what it does. The best place to uniquely identify a link is in the link text. Good examples are: "View Assignment 34," "Visit Entomological Society of America," etc.

  • If you think of a vertical series of items as a list, you should include it in your page as a numbered or bulleted list.  Screen readers can identify lists; for example, a bulleted list containing two items may begin: "List of  two items. Bullet 1."

  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    How can I make tables more accessible?

    Manual Sakai Basics
  • Manual Sakai Basics
  • Updated on: Apr 13, 2018

    Accessibility Information

    Sakai is a Learning Management System created to assist faculty and students by providing online tools for communication, assessment, content delivery, etc.

    Sakai is composed of sites, and each site has a number of tools selected by the site creator. There is also a special site, My Workspace, private to you, where you can access personal information and change your settings.

    This document is assistive technology agnostic and will briefly describe the different areas of the interface, point out how they are implemented for accessibility, and go into more depth where extra assistance may be needed.

    If you need specific help with your assistive technology, please contact your institution's office for Disability Student Services and/or Information Technology Services.

    For additional information visit the Accessibility Working Group on the Confluence Wiki.

    Note: The content depicted in images on this page may differ from what you experience, due to your institutions customization of Sakai.

  • Everybody experiences the world, including content they access on the internet, in their own way.  How someone experiences content on the internet can be vastly different depending on the computer or device and size of the screen on which they view it, and how they interact with it.

    For example, while some people read text and interpret images they view, others use assistive technology to listen to content using a screen reader.  Meanwhile, some people click on links using a mouse or similar device, while others navigate using a keyboard or by tapping on touch screens.

    Improving the accessibility of content is about reducing basic barriers to comprehension, such as providing alternative text for images, so that those who cannot see the images can grasp their meaning.  Similarly, making captions or transcript text available for a video file can make it accessible to someone who cannot hear audio.

    For more technical information about making content accessible, see What are some guidelines for making content accessible?